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The Great British Holiday ft. Plants

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One of the things Corona virus has done has brought back the great British holiday. Swapping Aperol spritz for a local cider, and tapas for a sausage roll, the public has seemed to rediscover the joys of a British holiday. This blog will touch on some of the most identifiable plants of England Scotland Wales and Ireland and hopefully transport you back to your hols around the country! 

Scotland – Heather  

Whilst the national flower of Scotland is a thistle , I would say the most characteristic flower of Scotland is heather. The purple heather that abundantly covers the moorland hills and glens of Scotland is a wonderful sight with this hardy shrub managing to survive the sometimes artic conditions of Scottish weather! The most common type of heather found in Scotland is ‘ling’ heather which loves wet soil and can endure pretty much any conditions ( pretty perfect for Scotland then!). 

If you would like to transport your garden to a Scottish moor then why not plant up some varieties of heather in your beds to give character and body to your garden. 

Wales – Daffodils 

The national flower of wales and a really popular flower in general , the Welsh daffodil is a thing of beauty and in spring can be found growing abundty all over Wales. So what makes a Welsh daffodil different from a England one ? It’s the colour , the all over bright buttercup yellow which characterises a Welsh daffodil can be different from the other varieties that we can see in the UK. 

Just wait for spring and daffodils will be popping up all over the place. If you want to make your garden daffodil ready then get planting your bulbs now as this is prime time to start getting your garden sorted for next year. 

England – Rose

What is more quintessentially English than a rose garden? Roses for me make me think of my granny’s garden with a cup of tea and a biccy , but there are  some truly astonishing rose gardens around England that are worth a visit ( Queen Mary’s Rose garden in regents park being one of them). 

If you want to enjoy these beautiful flowers in your own garden there are  hundreds of varieties you can pick, however some of my faves are the Damask Rose & the ‘Julia Child’ hybrid Rose.

Ireland – Shamrock 

The national flower and a symbol of good luck and prosperity, the shamrock is actually just a type of clover. The three leaf clover is a plant that is very popular in Ireland with its 3 leaves meant to symbolise the son the father and the holy ghost. 

Bring some luck to your garden and try growing some of these guys this year and maybe you will find yourself a four leaf clover!